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Replicon.

Lancashire Science Festival

29.06.17-

01.07.17

Located in the Hanover Project Gallery, Replicon brings together three of UCLan’s finest art students whose work investigates the close relationships between Art & Science. Each of the artists seeks to successfully conceptualise biochemical reactions and triggers within the human body.

Amanda Sutton.

EEG’s are a method of diagnosis for epilepsy, after much research and experimentation converting the unseen EEG waveforms into esoteric sounds which can be visualised through water. The Bath tub represents society’s adherence to the diagnosis and view that epileptics should not take baths. The electronic brain waves are converted to sound waves which finally become waveforms in water which can be visualised therefore the unseen (hidden) becomes visible and therefore tangible. This gives the viewer the opportunity the experience the distressing, dangerous and confusing experience of seizure.

Kerry Tenbey

My work explores sensations of touch. More specifically, exploring the complex relationships between virtual and physical intimacy, interpersonal communication and detachment, and how the technological advancements of the 21st century in communications are changing the way we encounter one another.

Mathew Herbert

Every day in the UK, roughly 87 people are diagnosed with epilepsy. Receiving a diagnosis of Epilepsy can be met with fear, anger and in extreme cases, relief of finally been given a diagnosis, but what is not known by people who have never had to experience the debilitating disease, either personally or through a family member; is how little is understood by the “normal” person.

The most well-known part of Epilepsy without a doubt is that with epilepsy comes seizures, but one of the most difficult, and commonly unknown parts of having epilepsy; is the debilitating effect that the seizure can have on the person both mentally and physically.

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